Golf Manufacturers – Too busy looking for freebies

We get inquiries, lots of them, regarding our service from golf companies desperately in need of finding golf reps… especially around this time of the year light of the upcoming PGA show.

Many of these companies are just “shopping” for free info and/or service with zero-point-zero intent of making a purchase.

The conversations include questions like:

  • how many reps are in your database?
  • can we get access to your database?
  • are there any guarantees?
  • explain the current the promotion?
  • how long is it?
  • can we try your service for free???

We understand and welcome inquiries and questions from serious buyers, appreciate negotiating a fair deal AND realize not every inquiry is going to convert to a customer.

However the type of shoppers we’re talking about have no real intention of buying.

They’re simply trying to get comped, free stuff. Always in search of something for nothing.

We all know the type.

They’ll do anything to avoid taking action unless they’re desperate or its free.

Typically the conversation ends with “let’s see how we make out at the show”.

Then 9 times out of 10, once the show ends (with zero success getting good rep leads on their own) they call back wanting the promotion at which time it’s too late…done, ended, kaput!

Steer clear of owners/managers with a”freebie mentality”. It’s usually indicative of how they run their business. They’re takers not givers.

Not the type of customers we want.

We want customers who see the value of getting the sales recruiting word out before during and after the show.

We want customers who use all their sources to recruit including word-of-mouth and reaching out to reps directly.

We want customers who provide a valuable service/product that sells along with great customer service and appreciate the value of paying for a quality service.

These type of golf companies find and keep sales reps through Golfsurfin.com.

If recruiting salespeople is a priority and you see the value of using all resources,including direct contact with over 4,200 active golf sales pros, then click here to register and get started.

 

Good Deed Speaks Volumes

Had to have our house treated for termites (2nd time within 12 months) which is a major pain in the butt and major headache for home owners in South Florida.

Open food and medications have to double wrapped in plastic and tied with duct tape…and you have to leave house for 48 hrs ughhh!

We have a greyhound so stayed in a pet friendly hotel in Coconut Grove, a very cool, urban town in Miami.

The long/short of it was my dog, out of her comfort zone, got overheated on a walk and basically collapsed on a sidewalk.

Kind strangers stopped, including a car with 2 young men.

Noticing the fear and panic in my eyes, these young samaritans asked if I needed a ride and wound up driving me and Pearl (my dog) 6 miles out of their way to a pet emergency center.

During our ride, between thanking them profusely, my 2 new heroes said they were chefs at a major hotel in Miami and were on their way to work.

Despite being late and inconvenienced they both said they were “dog people” and just doing the right thing by stopping and helping.

When we pulled in to the hospital, assistants were waiting and swept Pearl out of the car. I gave my final thank yous and handed them a $20.00 bill, the only cash I had in my fanny pack, for a car wash.

Weeks later I wrote their boss and explained what happened and how lucky he was to have these gentleman as employees.

His response was:

” …They did let me know what happened and they both did the right thing! These guys both show the same care and comfort to our guests and employees here at the hotel so it sure doesn’t surprise me that they act this way outside of work…”

-Michael DeGano

Director of Food & Beverage

EPIC Hotel

Here’s the catch.

When interviewing a candidate for any job in golf/hospitality find out what they do on their free time. What makes them feel good? What’s important to them outside of work? Maybe ask for an example of a kind or generous deed they’ve recently performed or experienced. Do they volunteer or give back to a charity or friend or relative…whatever.

You can gauge the quality of a candidate by the way she/he lives their lives without getting too personal.

9 times out of 10 if doing for others turns them on, they’ll be stellar employees.

Learn an Interviewing Tip or Two Ordering Mock Cocktails

Was in NYC last month and one of the things my husband and I like to do is watch broadway plays and eat!

Before seeing “Glass Menagerie” starting Sally Fields, which by the way was a pretty intense show, grabbed dinner at The Lambs Club, right across the street from the theatre…couldn’t have plannedan impromptu reservation any better.

The Lambs Club is an old established thespian club (started in the 1800’s) with a dining room dripping in history including one of those big 10ft high and wide fire places.

You could just tell it’s one of those places that makes killer cocktails.

Once seated, the waiter came with a drink menu. Included were 3 beautifully described Mock Cocktails. Been laying off “the juice” (alcohol) so was excited to order a special “virgin” libation.

Couldn’t decide on which one.

Torn between the Cucumber Cooler or Rosemary Blush…the blush caught my eye.

However instead of going with my gut I asked the server for her recommendation.

After a couple of qualifying questions she suggested the Cucumber Cooler which arrived beautifully presented.

Took one sip and immediately knew it was too tart!

Wound up timidly, sending back my drink and getting the citrusy Rosemary Blush which was perfect.

Was heck does all this drink talk have to do with recruiting?

I’ll tell you what…once you know what you want don’t deviate from the plan OR let someone else change your mind.

Same rule applies to hiring.

When you’re interviewing a club candidate, know the qualifications you want and the type of person that will excel in the position. And never deviate from needed qualifications.

How do you know what you want?

Learn from past employee/employees, what you liked and disliked about them and write it down. (For new positions list your top qualifications needed for that particular postion).

For example, if you’re seeking a General Manager did the last one have great people skills, did he give good “warm and fuzzies” by interacting with the membership and guests daily or did he prefer staying behind a desk?

Did he communicate with the Membership Director and help create new marketing ideas or did he have poor sales skills .

Was he weak or strong on budget management?

Were employees motivated or was there high turnover?

Did Board members push him around or did he command respect from the Board?

You get my drift.

Go a step further and develop a job ad and/or job description (or at the very least update an existing one) around these wants. Theres a big difference between job ads and job descriptions….we’ll discuss this topic another time.

Once you figure out your “Want List” (notice I use Want vs Wish list…wishes are something you would like to have, wants are needed), Don’t deviate from the list when interviewing candidates.

If you’ve done the work and know what you want, do not let a candidate or anyone else for that matter talk you into hiring a someone for the wrong reasons.

Don’t sway from the plan.

You’re more likely to hire the best candidate if you develop a plan and stick to it!

Resume Cluster – Find Bigger Needle in Smaller Haystack


Was listening to Sirius radio the other night while driving home and there was an on-line dating expert giving advice on finding the perfect mate.

Not in the dating market but the conversation peaked my curiostity nevertheless.

Forgot the guy’s name but the most important tip he gave was to pursue a limited amount of dating candidates. Reason being too many options creates indecision.

Better to stick with a “finite” number of potential “love connections” and go from there.

Got me thinking…the same theory applies to club management recruiting.

When searching hundreds of resumes on large job boards there’s so much information and so many candidates, the search becomes one big cluster you know what!

You would be much better off with a quality pool of candidates vs. quantity.

This brings me to our offer.

When purchasing a Golf Candidate Blast, Triple 7 Membership Package or Target Search Service receive FREE access to our resume database.

All of our golf club candidates are either employed in the golf industry or want to break-in.

This narrows the “playing field” so you can focus on the most qualified candidates available…and it’s FREE with the above services!

Save Time.
Save Money
Increase Number of Quality Candidates

If you’re ready to uncover a bigger needle in a smaller, high-quality haystack, click here to get started.

St. Valentine was beaten and stoned…then decapitated!

Yikes…what’s with that?

I thought the meaning of Valentines Day was an expression of love and appreciation.

How does one spin a tortuous death into a day of “gushing” love?

Let me explain.

Back in the day, around 260 AD, society was permissive, lot’s of promiscuity and partying. Polygamy was very common.  A mean old emperor named Claudius ll banned marriage because he thought single men made better soldiers. Meanwhile, a roman priest named Valentinus secretly married Christian couples. He was eventually caught, imprisoned, tortured and beheaded. Poor guy.

Now here’s the twist.
Legend has it while imprisoned he fell in love with a young, blind female visitor, the jailer’s daughter named Julia. On the eve of his death he signed a note to her “From your Valentine”.

Fast foward to this modern holiday as we know it and according to Money Mazazine, Valentine’s Day spending reached approximately $19.7 billion in 2016.

Quite a profitable spin on a tragic story line! Here’s my point.

Anyone can take a negative event and spin it into a totally different meaning or to what they want you to believe. In fact, this rendition of Valentines Day is just one of many and for all we know the whole thing could’ve been made up.

Same spin happens in business all the time.

Take job boards for example. Maybe a small percentage of golf companies have actually had success using general job boards but they don’t tell you that.  They  promise tons of qualified candidates and great results to anyone willing to shell-out hundreds of dollars worth of fees for a 30 day ad, even though these claims are based on a very small percentage of users.

Bottom line is they don’t care what you post as long as they get your money!

At GolfSurfin.com, we don’t make false promises. If you post a crummy ad you’re going to get crummy results. We urge our customers to write a solid job ad that’s honest, sells the company’s benefits and clearly spells out “what’s in it” for the candidate.

Back from the PGA show – now what

So you returned from the PGA Show last week as an exhibitor or attendee and “hocked your wares” to anyone and everyone who would listen. In fact, you’ve met a couple of sales people who look and sound pretty decent and have shown interest in your product/service.

Now what?

You follow-up with them and hopefully they respond back within the next couple of weeks. If all goes well you’ll do your due diligence and check references including current customers because you’re smart. Then you’ll negotiate a compensation agreement and send samples if required.

Then the waiting game starts….

If the rep is legit you’ll get an order within 30, 60 or 90 days or longer depending on factors like product/service demand, rep customer base (hopefully one exists), rep’s work ethic, time of year etc….

Finally wah lah the first order appears!

Now real work starts.

You’ll bend-over backwards to fill the order as seamlessly and professionally as possible in a timely manner. Then with a big happy smile, you’ll pay the rep the agreed upon commission rate within the agreed upon time-frame.

Why do soooo much work to please the customer and sales rep? Listen carefully…

because if the rep makes $$$ she/he will refer other good reps and that’s how one build a solid sales force!

Unless you’e a “big wig” like Nike or Adidas or Callaway good independent reps won’t be banging down your door. If you’re a small company and/or new to the golf industry and fortunate enough to find “a diamond in the rough” treat them and their customers like royalty and watch your sales and your sales force grow in leaps and bounds!

Blah blah blah golf job ads

Have you ever noticed, particularly in the golf industry, how boring job ads can be. These types of ads are outdated job descriptions cut and pasted into a job board ad. Bad, lazily written ads…if written at all…are ineffective recruiting tools that attract “bottom feeders” or “dregs” of the candidate pool.

They usually read like so:

Title – General Manager
(I’m choosing a GM title here but you could add any department head title i.e. Membership Director, Controller, F&B Manager, Operations Manager, Chef etc…and find the same results).

Next is usually a little blurb about the club, where it’s located and how long it’s been around. Then comes the dreaded Responsibilities, then Experience/Qualifications, then Compensation (if even mentioned is very general ,non specific) then more Blah blah blah.



Reading such ads is about as exciting as sitting in a traffic jam or a doctor’s waiting room or being kept on hold or watching the Kardashians…yuck…you get the picture.

What’s in it for the candidate? Absolutely nothing. Why would a “super star” golf manager apply to a boring, basic job description written with no effort or enthusiasm? They won’t. In fact candidates who will apply are typically desperate for a job.  They’re the “dregs”of the candidate pool who could care less about making an impact at the club/organization or job satisfaction or a supportive workplace. All a “dreg” wants is a paycheck and will say anything during the interview process to get it. Period.

So sharpen your pencil or clean your keyboard and chuck the old blah job description. Instead, write an honest and enthusiastic job ad.

Then post it on the #1 golf job board avoided by “dregs”, GolfSurfin.com. Click here to get started.

GolfSurfin.com’s Recruiting Service Stinks…

…at least that’s what one customer thought.

Let me explain.

A new customer wanted to try our service and asked for my advice on how to make a successful ad.

I responded:

“…I suggest, if you don’t already have one, to write an ad as if you were a sales person and include things you would like to see …especially how reps will make $$$ carrying your line. Include points like what makes your company/product unique, why your product will sell and any company accolades/accomplishments. Again there’s thousands of companies that come and go seeking independent sales people in golf. Try to set yourself apart from the pack, tell a unique story and make good on promises made to reps. If done properly they will be banging down your door…”

He wrote an ad and sent it out yet did not receive the response he was hoping for.

Moral of this story is we can’t guarantee a great candidate response  for every company who uses us.

The ad may have to be tweaked and distributed a few times to produce great results.  Sometimes no matter what is written there’s just not a whole lot of excitement out there about the product/service. Such companies may have to re-strategize and come-up with a new marketing and/or business plan.

Point is you’ve got to start somewhere and put your “best foot forward”  to start attracting sales people.  It’s not an easy process for all companies but sitting back and “waiting” for the reps to come  is, in most cases, a fantasy.

The one guarantee I can make is we treat every company equally. We’ll “Blast” your ad to a database (over 4,000) of active golf sales pros within 24 hours of posting.

If you believe you have a solid golf product/service to sell and need reps, click here to get started.

The Scary Angry Sales Rep

Wrote a blog entry about independent golf reps (Hiring Sales Reps – Promises Promises see below) who make empty promises to manufacturers. The point of the message was for employers to perform “due diligence” when hiring a rep before wasting time and $$$ on those frighteningly devilish candidates making empty promises.

An angry rep, who’s blood was obviously curdling after reading the entry, responded back that my commentary was offensive AND I should not criticize golf reps in general. In other words “don’t bite the hand that feeds you”.

I was a little spooked at first that a sales person took the time to write such a scathing reply. In fact, he was even upset that I referenced “Zig Ziglar” ( Zig was the selling guru back in the day).

Booo…thats scary angry!

There are many hard working, professional, independent sales people in the golf industry who are trustworthy and do a great job with the lines they represent. I call them Superheroes. They are the good sales guys & girls GolfSurfin.com helps by connecting them with our customers.

The fact is that there are some bad apples, scammers out there who take advantage of golf manufacturers…especially companies new to the golf industry.

Beware. Bad reps come in a variety of disguises:

-Ghosts or Mummies are the reps you never hear from once they get their samples
-Ghouls tarnish your brand by lack of customer follow-up
-Grim Reapers give wrong company information or make false promises to customers
-The infamous Vampires/Vampiresses usurp all company resources yet never makes quota or significant sales; all they do is complain

To help avoid getting involved with sales Monsters, conduct background checks like:

-call references
-customers
-former employers
-other sales people
-check social media etc.

Don’t just accept a good sales pitch that winds up being just that…a good sales pitch.

10 Strange Come-Ons By Creative Candidates

In a recent survey,* hiring managers gave these examples of unusual tactics job seekers used to stand out … not always for the right reasons:

1 – Came dressed in a Halloween costume during a late October interview.
2 – Bought a first-class upgrade to sit next to the hiring manager on a transatlantic flight
3 – Had his wife make homemade lavender soap bars for the hiring manager as a thank you for the interview.
4 – Sent a pair of embroidered socks to HR with a note saying he would knock the company’s socks off if hired.
5 – Showed up in his camp counselor attire with some children from the camp he worked at to show his leadership capabilities.
6 – Sent a shoe with a flower in it, plus a note saying: “Trying to get my foot in the door.”
7 – Arrived to the interview in a white limousine, an hour early, dressed in a three-piece suit. (The open position was middle-wage and had a casual      dress code.)
8 – Kissed the hiring manager.
9 – Wore a tie that had the name of the company on it.
10 – Mailed the hiring manager an envelope with cash inside.

Ok I agree. These methods are pretty kooky and “over the top”… my personal favorite is #10.

That being said, you’ve got to give credit to the candidate who’s unique and stands-out albeit in a professional manner.

There’s nothing worse then sitting through another boorrring interview where the candidate gives rehearsed blah, blah blah answers to well thought-out questions.

They may look great on paper and say all the “right” things but lack pizaazz, spunck or fire in the gut!

Give me the girl/guy who’s creative, comes across as competent and maybe throws-in a little sense of humor.

Again, the above examples may be over the top but I’ll take the candidate who stands out from the pack (within reason of course) any day over “average”.

*Careerbuilder Survey