Club Management turnover – Elephant in the club

The average turnover for a club General Manager is approximately 2.5 years.*

When a GM leaves a club, other staff members follow.

Management turnover causes financial, motivational and emotional problems for club members and employees.

A must read for anyone associated with a private club particularly Board Members of private clubs, Committee members of Member owned clubs and department heads, is “The Elephant in the Club” – Private Club General Manager Job Security and Turnover – Whitepaper”

Richard McPhail, CCM | Jul 26, 2016.

McPhail discusses in depth why management turnover is chronic (and hasn’t really changed much over the past 20 years) and gives suggestions, ideas and/or remedies clubs can use to instill consistency and avoid change.

Ideas like:

  • Understanding the private club model…different from a public business
  • Appropriate budgeting. Are wanted member amenities and services realistic with the budget?
  • Strategic Planning. Sticking to long-term asset preservation and amenity renewal plans.
  • Making goals and communication clear between the the board, members and GM.
  • Consistency. Retaining and maintaining a loyal staff.

Given the fact that turnover is fairly high in private clubs (we’re guessing turnover numbers are somewhat similar in semi-private and public golf facilities), recurring recruiting costs are steep.

GolfSurfin.com offers recruiting services that are both affordable and effective for golf clubs.

If your club has an open staff position, check-out our Target Search Service.

Click here for more details.

, ,

PGA show moment

Just returned from the 2020 PGA Show in Orlando.

Had a great time meeting customers, viewing and trying new products, and making new friends.

But what struck me most was an interaction I had with a sales rep who uses GolfSurfin.com

While walking the show floor, someone tapped me on the shoulder and asked my name.

He said he noticed the logo on my shirt and wanted to introduce himself.

We shook hands and exchanged the usual first meeting pleasantries.

He then said he wanted to meet me because, as a result of our service, he was able to pickup a great line and deeply appreciated what we do and how we do it.

I was kind of caught off-guard and thanked him for the compliments.

As I walked away my eyes teared up for just a few seconds.

The most gratifying feeling one can have (at least for me) is to know that what you do for a living is actually helping another person and/or maybe adding to their quality of life…even if it’s just a teeny, tiny bit.

So despite being surrounded by tons of the fun, a simple Thank You from an appreciative service user was my most impactful experience at this year’s show.

Ok enough sappyness.

If you or your company is in need of quality sales reps, check-out our Sales Rep Blast Package.

Details below.

Dawn Schlesinger
Chiefgolfologist
Dawn@GolfSurfin.com

You don’t know jack about Thanksgiving

…at least we don’t at GolfSurfin.com.

Did you know there are over 200 websites discussing what really occurred during the very first official Thanksgiving celebration?

In fact, there’s a debate on just about every aspect of the first Thanksgiving meal including WHEN and WHERE it actually took place and WHO attended.

In reality, much of the information we were taught in school about Thanksgiving wasn’t necessarily true.

Details were manipulated and given a more positive “spin”.

Here are just a few interesting myths:

THE MENU

No turkey, cranberries, or pumpkin pie on the first Thanksgiving table. Instead the menu choices probably included passenger pigeon, venison, lobster, clams, mussels and eel.

No bread or butter or even sugar was available at that time!

ATTENDEES 

18 adult woman boarded the Mayflower. Yet by the time the first Thanksgiving was celebrated in the Autumn of 1621, of the 50 colonists who attended, only 4 were women!

Unfortunately for the men and women who arrived on the Mayflower, many did not survive that difficult first year in the U.S..

Regarding the Native American guests, no-one really knows for sure whether they were invited OR were already in the area busy with their own harvests and crashed the party.

UTENSILS 

No forks! Only knives and spoons were used at the first Thanksgiving table.

The origin of this fact is gray. Some sources claim colonists had forks yet traded them with native Indians for supplies and information. Others claim forks had not yet been invented. Instead, settlers ate with spoons, knives and their fingers!

When it comes to Thanksgiving facts or any claims made by anyone for that matter, you really don’t know what you’re getting until you do your research.

Which brings us of our Sales Rep Blast Promotion.

If you’re seeking sales assistance and like discounts, save 15% on our Sales Rep Blast Package for a limited time.

(If you miss the promo, purchase Sales Rep Package anyway. We’ll find independent reps for your company quickly & professionally and it’s still a great deal!)

Purchase package, save $$…no research needed!

Click here to get started.

Beware of Spooky Golf Employers

Employers constantly complain about bad candidates, a lack of solid ones available and turnover.

But what about scary employers?

You know the ones that never take responsibility for screwing-up the interview process and/or cause turnover.

In the spirit of Halloween, let’s look at some of the most scary golf employers that should be avoided during your job search.

The Ghost

The ghastly employer who “ghost”, fail to acknowledge applications, is the #1 culprit for angry candidate creation. This type of employer cannot get their act together to acknowledge receipt of your resume and/or position throughout the interview process.

It’s rude and unprofessional and eventually tarnishes the employer’s reputation.

Golf employers who ghost are usually the top tier manufacturers and golf clubs who get tons of applications for just about any position they post.

A funny twist that started about 2 years back, is that employers are now being ghosted by candidates!

The bottom line is poor etiquette on both sides.

The Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde Employer

These ugly ghouls lurk throughout the interview process creating havoc the very first day at the workplace.

They describe your “dream job” during the interview yet when you accept the offer and begin employment, the job is not what you expected.

For example, you accept a job as GM thinking you’re the decision maker on most club issues yet quickly find out “the board” is really in-charge; you’re hired as a chef, clearly describing your talent in the fine dining arena during your interview, only to find out that club members demand basic comfort food. Or as a sales rep you take-on a new product and realize, after a couple of customer visits, there were four sales reps before you in two years in two years who failed miserably with the same line.

The Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde employer is dangerous because what you see is not what you get!

The Revolving Door Employer

Title sounds innocent enough but its effects are deadly.

Revolving door workplaces experience high turnover…when a % of employees leave your club/company over one year.

High turnover wastes money, time and kills a good company reputation.

Most importantly, turnover is like a hidden disease that starts with one employee and spreads throughout the organization.

The Revolving Door employer also creates low employee morale. When people start falling like hotcakes employees who remain start to wonder why they’re still there…even becoming bitter.

No one wants to be caught dead within The Revolving Door Employer!

So candidates beware of the above employers not just around Halloween but throughout the year.

And if you’re like one of the employers described above, chances are there are some issues within your company or its culture that must be solved before you start hiring new employees again.

If you’re an employer who refuses to wear one of the above costumes and have a position/positions to fill, post your job now.

Dawn McGarry Schlesinger
ChiefGolfJobologist
Dawn@GolfSurfin.com

,

Take advantage of salespeople who call on your shop

Came across an article written in 1977 for Golf Business magazine titled “Take advantage of the salesmen who call on your shop”. Btw should now be titled “salespeople”.

The article gives a “birds eye” view of the trials and tribulations of a golf sales rep in “olden times”.

Thought it would interesting and valuable to compare the sales process today vs. yesterday.

We contacted a slew of current, solid golf reps and asked them to read the article then give their opinions on what they believe to be the biggest changes now vs. selling then.

Here’s what they said:

Buyers are unqualified – Gone are the days when golf pros owned their own shops. Today plenty of shops are staffed by under qualified employees, poorly maintained and merchandised and overall, unappealing to the buyer. Golf reps today must be product experts, know their accounts and educate the buyer. The most important task for today’s rep is to build customer rapport and figure-out which product will sell in each particular shop. Learning buying habits of club members is crucial!

Reps need to be picky when choosing lines – Buyers today don’t have lots of time and patience to spend on new product introduction. Typically this gives the rep time for maybe 2-4 new product/service presentations so the rep has to be smart and creative in what’s shown to the buyer. A big problem these days is golf reps carry too many lines. Some carry 10–15 lines. Unfortunately they throw as much product at the buyer as possible to see what sticks. This approach “waters down” the sales person’s credibility leaving a pissed-off buyer and manufacturer!

Golf sales reps have always had to be knowledgeable, honest and creative even back in the 70’s when the average price of a new home was $49,300.00, a gallon of gas cost 65 cents and a shiny new BMW 320i set one back around $8,000.00.

Current times are much tougher.

Green grass pro shops are up against on-line venues and big box stores making it nearly impossible to compete on price. Not to mention the overall health of the industry – shrinking since the glory days of Tiger Woods.

Reps today need to work smarter, prioritize the customer’s needs and be product “picky”. And for all you club pro shops out there with seasonal/temporary help, take advice from your loyal sales rep!

Although times have changed, some challenges remain the same.

Dawn Schlesinger
Chiefgolfjobologist
Dawn@GolfSurfin.com

Interview – Secrets of a Con Man Part I

You may be thinking why in the world would anyone want to interview like a con artist.

They cheat, lie and steal and overall have more then a bad rap – they’re just plain bad people.

That’s what I thought too until I stumbled upon a list of strategies and techniques used very successfully by con men/women.

Con people are exceptional at the art of persuasion.

And who better to use these techniques in a positive, legitimate manner than candidates applying and interviewing for golf jobs.

Now if this sounds like a bunch of b…s… to you, stop reading right now.

However, if you’re a bit unconventional and open to learning new persuasion techniques that may very well improve your chances of scoring the perfect golf gig, read on.

In this post, Part 1, we’ll cover 4 important secrets that can help you ace an interview and land a great golf job.

Con Artist Select #1 – Find out what a company wants and figure out a way to give it to them

If you can uncover what your potential employer needs or a problem they’re facing (a “pain”) and you can help solve that problem if they hire you, you’re golden. The fact that you’re even discussing their problems puts you way above the competition.

Con Artist Secret #2- Choose the right mark

The right mark for our purposes is the hiring manager. As most of us know by now the hiring manager’s name, tile, work history and interests can be found on Linkedin, company websites, job postings etc… Once your mark is uncovered, research something about them i.e. where they went to school, hobbies, interests, charities anything that can align you with the decision maker before and during an interview. This is why our White Glove service works so well. We blast a concentrated copy of your resume directly to decision makers in the golf industry.

Con Artist Secret #3 – Listen don’t talk (yet)

This the probably the most valuable secret to use in any sales scenario especially if you’re selling yourself. Listen to what the employer is saying. What went wrong with the last person they hired? What are they looking for now in a candidate? What do they want to achieve, acquire or accomplish in their department, company or club? The best way to uncover this information in an interview is to ask good questions and let them talk.

Con Artist Secret # 4 – The foot-in-the-door trick

“Sticking one’s foot in the door” means to ask someone for something small. Ever walk by kiosks in the mall and the young girls and guys hocking soaps, creams of perfumes or whatever typically ask you a question? They’re trying to lure you slowly into buying their product one small step at a time. For our purposes, I think a similar technique is applicable at the end of an interview. Qualifying questions like “How do I look compared to other candidates you’re interviewing” or “Do you think I’m qualified for this position?” or “Do you think I’m a good fit for this opportunity?”.  Most interviewers will respond positively and the beauty is once they commit to you verbally, they become more committed to you psychologically. The mere fact that you’re qualifying them puts you above the competition. I cant tell you how many strong candidates with tons of experience and accomplishments are either afraid or neglect asking for the job.

There are actually 43 con artists secrets. I’m only taking the ones I think are applicable to job hunting and will review more in my next post.

You can view them all here.

P.S. Ready to apply some of these interviewing tips? Check-out our White Glove service. We’ll package your resume starting with the headline explaining Why You Should be Hired…in a quick, easy-read format then send it directly to the “right” marks..golf job decision makers.

Dawn Schlesinger
Chiefgolfjobologist
Dawn@GolfSurfin.com

Two ways golf employers screw-up hiring

There are so many ways golf companies and clubs screw-up hiring good, solid candidates.

We’re going to address two of the most common hiring faux pas.

One:

Poorly Written Job Ads 

So many ads are written with the employer in mind – primarily focused on what they want and need in a candidate. Reality Alert…good candidates don’t give a hoot about what the employer wants at the beginning stage of a job search.

In today’s applicant pool, it’s a buyers market. Typically quality candidates already have a job and are looking around for something better OR they have multiple companies wooing them with opportunities. These candidates want to know “what’s in it for them?” Scratch the robotic verbiage about the company and/or product and replace it with the exciting and unique story about your company and open position.

Two:

Bad Job Ad Promotion

Job ads, particularly in the golf industry, are seen on free boards. Some are industry specific, most are not. Employers don’t seem to care about quality. Their mantra is ‘the cheaper the better” when it comes to recruiting. Here’s the problem with over-promotion on the wrong job boards. The employer usually ends-up with a slew of unqualified candidates or worse, hires the wrong candidate from this “dead pool” just to fill the job. Six to eights months down the road the not so new hire leaves usually creating havoc on her way down and the position becomes available again.

Ugh…not good.

Lesson here learned is not so earth shattering yet golf companies continue to make these same mistakes time and time again.

Next time you have to fill a position or if you currently have an ad that’s not really cutting it, think about why your company/product is great, why you’re passionate about working there and and why it’s unique place to be employed. Then tell the story in your ad. Next, figure out which job board/boards appeal to the type of candidate you need even if it costs a bit. It may be the best investment you make all year!

Dawn Schlesinger

Chiefgolfjobologist

Dawn@GolfSurfin.com

PS. GolfSurfin.com is the #1 job Board for golf

PSS. GolfSurfin.com a has a loyal following of candidates who either work in the golf industry or by those who want to break in to golf .

PSSS. Click here to post.

Companies with head in sand lose customers and sales reps

Was talking with a friend about a tennis pro who was coaching a huge named player on the ATP tour. Couldn’t believe how little this coach was being paid for his time. His weekly salary was comparable to that of a wallpaper hangar. No diss intended to wph’ers just making a point.

Got me thinking about the Matt Kuchar saga.

In case you haven’t heard, Kuchar played and won a golf tournament in Mexico, the 2018 Mayakoba Classic. His regular caddie couldn’t make it so he used a local guy named David Ortiz from a local club.

Kuchar won the tournament (first win in 4 years), and a grand prize of $1,296.000 of which Ortiz received $5000.00.

That’s .0039% of total winnings!

PGA Tour caddies typically get 10% of earnings, expenses paid and bonuses if their player finishes within the top10.

That’s bad.

Not only was it a measly pay-out but a really poor look for Kuchar, his “brand” along with his agent Mark Steinberg the worlds premier golf agent who also happens to manage Tiger Woods.

It gets worse.

Social media blew up calling Kuchar ”el cheapo”, jackass and worse yet he continued to hold his ground not budging from his defense.

Adding insult to injury, when asked about the evolving debacle Kuchar’s response was “I certainly don’t lose any sleep over this”.

Ouch!

Eventually Kuchar caved-in and paid Ortiz $50,000 plus an additional donation to charities in the Cancun area.

By denying the problem and defending his actions, Kuchar created a PR mess that could have long lasting negative effects on his career.

The point here is golf manufacturers help drive sales and create staying power by listening to customer and/or sales force complaints, admit when they are wrong, are open to change OR better yet, fix the problem.

Companies who make promises they can’t keep or slack on quality control or have chronic difficulties with recruiting and “high” turnover or struggle with brand recognition, don’t last very long in the golf industry.

These are the same organizations who are closed minded and get defensive or “ghost” when complaints appear…a recipe for disaster.

Instead be smart, listen and adapt.

Oh…one last thing…if you’re fortunate to have a few great salespeople or two on your team, treat them like gold!

It’s very difficult to recruit and keep honest, hard working independent golf reps. The good ones will “work their buns off” for you and become loyal brand ambassadors if treated fairly.

Speaking of recruiting, if your company needs sales talent exclusive to the golf industry check-out details below regarding our recruiting services.

Dawn Schlesinger
Chiefgolfjobologist

What’s donuts got to do with resume?

Let’s face it, it’s tough to get a good job in the highly competitive golf industry.

At GolfSurfin.com, I’m always preaching that candidates need to stand-out, do something different, take a different tack when applying to jobs.

Heres a great example.

A few years back a new young transplant from Lithuania named Lukas Yla was seeking a marketing gig in Silicon Valley, another nasty competitive industry full of talent.

Lukas got real creative by dressing-up as a Postmates delivery guy and delivered boxes of Mr. Holmes Bakehouse doughnuts to some of the biggest Bay Area tech companies like Lyft, Uber, Instacart and Postmates with a pitch: give him a job.

The result?

He scored over 10 interviews with the companies and ad agencies.

According to Yla “People appreciate this approach. They understand that it requires time, creativity and a hustler attitude”.

This approach may be a bit too extreme or gimmicky for you (I for one think its pretty ballsy) but this story does make the point that creativity is rewarded for those bold enough to be different.

Not everyone has to dress-up as imposter to get her/his foot in the door.

There are various ways to make a good impression during the job application process.

One way is to use the easiest, most cost effective job seeking tool in the industry called GolfSurfin.com’sWhite Glove” service.

Through White Glove your quick-read headline will highlight your unique qualities and great benefits you will bring to the table and send it directly to hiring managers, HR executives and golf company owners.

We’ll help present the best “you” possible in a timely, profession and honest manner at a price that won’t break the bank.

Want more details? Click here to get started.

Dawn Schlesinger
Chiefgolfjobologist

#1 question to ask in a sales interview

After working in the golf recruiting biz for so long – approaching 20 years – and helping countless companies with their sales recruiting needs including independent reps, I’m constantly being told about the trials and tribulations of finding and keeping good dependable sales people.

Got me thinking.

If I were a golf manufacturer talking to a potential sales candidate to fill one of my territories what would be the most important interview question to ask?

After much thought and ponder, cause so many topics running through my head like past production, tenure in a territory, account base, personality, reputation, existing lines etc., etc., I came to a conclusion.

If I had to narrow it down to one question it would be the following:

“Where does or would my line stand in priority to everything else she/he is selling?

In other words, if a rep carries let’s say 3-5 lines including a major one (a top tier brand), does she present that top brand first OR does she ask the customer permission to start with other products/services. If given permission, where does my line “fit” on the priority list? Depending on the answer I can determine if my line is or would be receiving sufficient time and consideration from a buyer.

Again there are countless questions and concerns to discuss with a potential new hire and the better prepared and in-depth your inquiries are, the more valuable info you’ll uncover to help make the best hiring decision for your company.

Once you have your questions lined-up and ready to go you need to find candidates interview.

An awesome place to source golf sales pros is through GolfSurfin.com.

Why?

You get to post your ad on the #1 job board for golf and breeze through our resume database full of qualified sales candidates from the golf industry.

Ready to take a shot? Get started here.

Dawn Schlesinger
Chiefgolfjobologist